EYE ON CHINA: GDP

Today’s GDP contraction data was expected. The 6.8% figure for Q4 was in line with median estimates, but it was still disappointing for the glass half full crowd who were hoping for just a little bit more and have run for the exits -sending FXI, which we are long, down over 5%. We do not use hope as part of our process and we are retaining our long bias.

As we all know, the Q4 meltdown spurred a sharp contraction in trade globally and regardless of relative strength China could not avoid the pain, even if they are better off than many of their neighbors (Korea for instance, which we are short via the EWY ETF, printed numbers showing a 5.6% contraction in GDP and an 11.9% contraction in exports). We knew the backdrop for all of this was in the cards, but that is looking in the rear view mirror. In the here and now, a 4 trillion Yuan spending package is just starting to trickle through the system and the five cuts in the key lending rate, initiated in Sept. are just starting to nudge the Dragon.

It is critical to remind ourselves that China is still a communist nation –as such the party leaders are very aware that they must stem job losses and rescue symbolic industries in order to sustain the minimal rate of economic growth assumed to prevent internal social problems. Critics of some of our work on China often point out, correctly, that there is a good deal of “massaging” in reported Chinese economic data -but you can’t fool your hungry people with fake data (something that Christina Kirchner is discovering too late in Argentina).

These leaders don’t run for election, they don’t need to build consensus and they don’t have to apologize for bending rules. To achieve the growth levels they need, the Chinese government will use ANY and ALL tools at their disposal -including shrugging off any protests by team Obama over currency manipulation no matter how loud.

We are Watching China and its derivative economies closely and as always will be looking to change our exposure as data points present themselves.


Andrew Barber
Director