China Jitters

“We fear things in proportion to our ignorance of them.”

-Christian Nestell Bovee


All week I’ve been putting the finishing touches on what we think will be a revolutionary dynamic asset allocation model/global macro signaling platform; as such, I haven’t had much time to consume my “fair share” of financial news media in the week-to-date.


When I was able to perk my head up for a brief moment, I was somewhat startled to see the SPX down ~20 handles on “China jitters” yesterday.


Like many other financial news media headlines, I’m not quite sure how to interpret that one. Granted, no one is paying such platforms for differentiated, cutting-edge analytical insights, but sometimes I think their need for speed and coherent storytelling in a globally-interconnected, nonlinear ecosystem can get the better of them.


China Jitters - china


HEDGEYE POLL OF THE DAY: please reply “yes” to this email if it’s news to you that Chinese economic growth is slowing.


It’s worth noting that in the 15 quarters since Chinese real GDP growth hit a cycle-peak of +11.9% YoY in 1Q10, Chinese economic growth has accelerated sequentially only three times. It’s basically been a straight leg down for four consecutive years – so much so that on a trailing 3Y basis, the z-score for this series is (0.6x), which is actually up from trough of (1.6x) in 2Q12. In non-statistical speak, this implies that the “surprise factor” of Chinese #GrowthSlowing is burning off.


That isn’t to say that Chinese economic growth is not still slowing. In fact, the broad swath of high-frequency economic data (including yesterday’s releases) points to a continued slowdown. The current risk range in our predictive tracking algorithm has probable downside to +7.3% YoY for Chinese real GDP growth here in 1Q14, which would: A) be the slowest growth rate since 1Q09; and B) imply that the Chinese economy is not taking advantage of extremely favorable base effect tailwinds – a sign that sequential momentum is indeed decelerating.


For those of you who do not follow China closely, below we’ve compiled the relevant data points for your review, color coding them appropriately for ease of interpretation:

  • Fixed-Assets Investment: +17.9% YoY in JAN-FEB from +19.6% in DEC; +17.9% is the slowest growth rate since DEC ‘02
  • Industrial Production: +8.6% YoY in JAN-FEB from +9.7% in DEC; +8.6% is the slowest growth rate since APR ‘09
  • Retail Sales: +11.8% YoY in JAN-FEB from +13.1% in DEC
  • Total Social Financing: +938.7B CNY in FEB from +2,584.5B in JAN
    • New CNY Loans: +644.5B CNY in FEB from +1,320B in JAN
    • Non-traditional Financing (i.e. “shadow” banking): +17.2B in FEB from +993B in JAN
    • Ratio of Non-traditional Financing to Total Social Financing: 1.8% in FEB from 38.4% in JAN
  • Official Manufacturing PMI: 50.2 in FEB from 50.5 in JAN; 50.2 marked an 8M-low for the index
    • New Orders declined 40bps to an 8M-low of 50.5
    • Export Orders declined 110bps to an 8M-low of 48.2
  • Official Non-Manufacturing PMI: 55 in FEB from 53.4 in JAN
  • HSBC Manufacturing PMI: 48.5 in FEB from 49.5 in JAN; 48.5 marked a 7M-low for the index
    • New Orders and Output both fell below 50 (i.e. contracted) for the first time in 7M
    • Employment dropped to 47.2, which is its lowest reading since MAR ‘09
  • HSBC Non-Manufacturing PMI: 51 in FEB from 50.7 in JAN
  • Exports: (18.1%) YoY in FEB from +10.6% in JAN vs. a Bloomberg consensus estimate of +7.5%
  • Imports: +10.1% YoY in FEB from +10% in JAN vs. a Bloomberg consensus estimate of +7.6%
  • Trade Balance NSA: ($23B) in FEB from $31.9B in JAN vs. a Bloomberg consensus estimate of $14.5B; ($23B) marked the largest trade deficit since FEB ‘12
  • Trade Balance YoY: ($37.8B) YoY in FEB from +$3.8B YoY in JAN

Lots of red indeed…


Back to the Global Macro Grind


So what do you do with all of this? Like we’ve been saying since the start of DEC, you should simply allocate assets to “New China” plays in lieu of “Old China” plays. Refer to the Chart of the Day below for an example of how to implement this investment strategy.


The worst thing you can do as a fiduciary of other people’s capital is freak out about China ~4 years into a well-telegraphed, policy-induced growth slowdown.


That’s not to say the Chinese economy and its banking system won’t have its day of reckoning (it will; it has twice before in the last ~20-30 years after the popping of two credit bubbles that were also policy-induced); it’s merely to suggest that it might not be tomorrow. At any rate, we’ve done a ton of work on such risks over the past 6-9M, so please ping us if you’d like our help getting up to speed.


One key catalyst on the horizon is a potential shift to a monetary easing bias by the PBoC. To some degree, they’ve done this already: selling CNY in the open market to lower the reference rate – as they have done in recent weeks – floods the domestic banking system with liquidity. On the surface, they’ve mopped up this liquidity by issuing repos, but money market rates falling to near 2Y-lows suggests there is ample excess liquidity in the Chinese banking system.


Two additional points to consider regarding this potential catalyst:

  1. The Chinese yuan’s recent decline is not because of panic selling, but rather deliberate policy adjustments after speculative capital inflows helped fuel the fastest sequential rate of credit growth ever in JAN.
  2. Yesterday, for the first time since mid-2012, the State Council rhetorically supported the prospect of policy stimulus. This is in stark contrast to the “proactive and prudent” fiscal and monetary policy bias they’ve held for much of the past 18+ months.

While we all know they cannot stimulate indefinitely, there’s little-to-no denying the short-to-intermediate term impact increased government investment or a lower WACC could have on a Chinese economy that remains levered to fixed capital formation at roughly half of GDP. It’s worth noting that real interest rates (i.e. the benchmark 1Y lending rate less headline CPI) in China have backed up from a then-3Y low of ~0% in mid-2011 to near-4Y highs just north of 4%.


As always, time will tell on this catalyst. For those of you who crave a higher degree of analytical color at the current juncture, please refer to our latest report titled, “IS THIS THE BEGINNING OF THE END FOR CHINA?” (3/10).


Our immediate-term TRADE risk ranges across Global Macro are now as follows:


UST 10yr Yield 2.59-2.75%

VIX 14.62-16.39

USD 79.31-79.94

Gold 1


Keep your head on a swivel,



Darius Dale

Associate: Macro Team



China Jitters - Chart of the Day


China Jitters - Virtual Portfolio

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Funny Fed

This note was originally published at 8am on February 28, 2014 for Hedgeye subscribers.

“To me being a gangster was better than being President of The United States.”

-Henry Hill


While I’m not sure if one of New York City’s most infamous mobsters (1955-1980) said it that way, Ray Liotta did in Goodfellas. So that’s good enough for me. Great flick. Just like the Bernanke and Yellen Fed... really funny.


Henry: “You’re a pistol! You’re really funny. You’re really funny!”

Tommy: “What do you mean I’m funny?”

Henry: “It’s funny, you know. It’s a good story; it’s funny, you’re a funny guy!”

Tommy: “What do you mean? The way I talk? What?” (everyone becomes quiet)

Henry: “It’s just, you know, you’re just funny – the way you tell the story and everything.”


Funny Fed - good


Janet "Mother of All Doves" Yellen is funny too.


She had us all right cracked up on the @Hedgeye HQ floor yesterday. The best part about her is that she actually believes what she said. On CNBC, Anthony, The Mooch, Scaramucci (not a character in the movie) called her an “intellectual stud.”




Back to the Global Macro Grind


But Janet, seriously, just get the heck out of here already. While it was fun buying everything other than US Dollars as you were outlining your qualitative policy to passively inflate, we have to go out there on the Street today and live in the real world.


Here’s what happened in the market yesterday as the Fed’s price fixing policy (“rate guidance”) took hold:

  1. Dollar Down
  2. Rates Down
  3. Stocks Up (sort of  - consumer and financial stocks still weak and down YTD)

This is very Q1 2011. The Dollar Down part isn’t funny because it’s an explicit #InflationAccelerating signal:

  1. Inverse correlation between USD and SPX (6 weeks) is now -0.85
  2. Inverse correlation between USD and CRB Commodities Index (6 weeks) is now -0.83
  3. Inverse correlation between USD and WTIC and Brent Oil (6 weeks) are now -0.85 and -0.90!
  4. Inverse correlation between USD and Gasoline (6 weeks) is now -0.92!
  5. Inverse correlation between USD and Gold (6 weeks) is now -0.93!

In other words, while she might look and sound like a crazy lady on TV, she actually has more power than the President of the United States at this point on the cost of living for Americans. This is plainly a Policy To Inflate. And it’s very dangerous, on many levels.


But don’t worry about the Dollar DOWN = Food, Gas, and Gold UP thing, because the “US stock market is up.” Yep, a whole +0.3% for 2014 to-date vs. the CRB Commodities Index and Gold +7.9% and +10.6% YTD, respectively.


After being “up” (in Burning Peso terms) +460% last year, Venezuela’s stock market was up +1.9% yesterday too. But Chavez was funny. Tommy: “Funny how? I mean, what’s funny about it?” (Goodfellas).


As John Allison states plainly in The Financial Crisis and The Free Market Cure, “countries do not go bankrupt the way businesses do. They typically hyperinflate – that is, print valueless money – and move to some form of authoritarian government.” (pg 8)


Authoritarian government? Think that’s funny? Or should we just take this un-elected lady’s word for it?


While the 80% of America who can’t invest in inflation gets jacked with it, we can make money (not funny for the “inequality” pitch). So protect yourself against US Currency Devaluation (new YTD lows this morning) and buy other countries’ currencies!


As you can see in the Hedgeye Asset Allocation Model:

  1. At 21%, Foreign Currency is back to my biggest weight (we’re long Euros and Pounds vs Burning Bucks)
  2. Commodities are 2nd at 18% (buy more Gold, Natural Gas, Oil, and Food Inflation on all pullbacks)
  3. Fixed Income and International Equities would be my 3rd favorite option

In other words, while the funny lady was cracking us all up yesterday, we didn’t jump into the market and buy things exposed to ~71% of the US economy (CONSUMPTION). We just ramped the #InflationAcccelerating position.


While it’s both comical and counter-intuitive to the Keynesian economist contingent that you buy bonds when inflation starts to breakout, the fact is that’s precisely what you do when the entire world knows the Fed has 0% credibility in fighting real-world inflation.


You buy commodities to own inflation. You buy bonds because you know that inflation slows growth. #InflationAccelerating to all-time bubble highs in 2011-2012 drove bond yields (growth expectations) to all-time lows (bonds to all-time highs) in late 2012 too.


Anthony: “Tommy, no, you got it all wrong”

Tommy: “You mean, let me understand this… ‘cause, ya know maybe its just me, I’m a little f’d up maybe, but I’m funny how?”

Henry: “Just… you know, how you tell the story”


Ben, Janet, and Tommy are Gangsta though – ask Cramer and The Mooch.


Our immediate-term Risk Ranges are now:


UST 10yr Yield 2.64-2.79%
SPX 1827-1857

USD 79.77-80.31

EUR/USD 1.36-1.38

Pound 1.66-1.68

Brent Oil 108.05-110.71

Natural Gas 4.23-5.14

Gold 1306-1348


Best of luck out there today,



Keith R. McCullough
Chief Executive Officer


Funny Fed - Chart of the Day


Funny Fed - Virtual Portfolio

$AMZN | Is It Worth the Extra $20?

Takeaway: Though a price increase likely should have happened years ago, Prime is good enough that an extra $20 bucks won't chase many away.

Editor's Note: Below is a brief, complimentary excerpt from Hedgeye Retail analysis. For more information on our services, click here.

Amazon Prime and Amazon Student Prime Membership Fee Changes


$AMZN | Is It Worth the Extra $20? - Amazon Prime image

  • "For the first time since it was introduced nine years ago, the price of Prime is going up. Existing Prime members will pay $99 per year on their annual renewal date and Amazon Student members will pay $49."
  • "The Prime Fresh membership fee will remain unchanged at $299."

Takeaway from Hedgeye’s Brian McGough:

Step 1 for Amazon was to get users hooked on its Prime service. Check. Mission accomplished.


Now, the company is going after price. And, while $20 may not seem like a big increase, when things change, people notice.


That being said, we have to admit that nine years is a long time to hold price steady. One could certainly argue that Amazon should have done this a number of years ago.


But all that really matters is what Prime offers. It's a sticky enough service that many won't be chased away by the $20 price hike.

Connect to Hedgeye.

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