prev

Remembrance Day

“Rules are not necessarily sacred, principles are”
-Franklin D. Roosevelt

Roosevelt was a lot of things to many people. To some, he was simply a regulator … to others a calmness. His “fireside chats” are often looked back on by historians not for their economic resolve, but for their tone. He had a wonderful temperament. He was a man of principle.

These, of course, are not the kinds of leadership qualities that you have been waking up to in the early mornings of 2008. I spend most of my reading time these days studying Hoover and Roosevelt, their economic policies, and the respective successes and failures associated with their decisions. There is always much to glean from history, and as Santayana said best, those who have not learned her lessons “are doomed to repeat them.”

While I have been a resident bear for some time now, I am not in the “Great Depression” camp… certainly not here and now. I continue to hold the line that 2008-2009 will be much more like the mid 1970’s than any other period – but let me be clear, no economic point in this country’s history is a carbon copy of another. Today’s unique differentiation lies in the interconnectedness of global market factors. This is not 1974. This is 2008. This is a world where global information and asset classes trade hands real time. This complex system of markets waits for no one. It is always on.

Today is Veteran’s Day in the US. Today is Remembrance Day in my homeland. Today is Independence Day in Poland. Today is a day to reflect and be thankful for the men and women of principle who have served their countries.

Michael Bloomberg is an American capitalist who is now serving his country. He built an iconoclastic American company that continues to provide the world with the faster and cheaper investment tools that quickly delineate fact from fiction. Bloomberg left Wall Street after the 1970’s meltdown and started his business with what he knew best – his principles.

Those who don’t respect duration in investment modeling probably dismiss what they usually do when endowed with an investment tool like Bloomberg – context. Bloomberg’s business didn’t even exist until 1981… and now, 27 years later, we have the weaponry at our fingertips that allows us to traverse the global plains of market data as fast as you can click and read.

This morning, a top 3 Bloomberg story headline is “Bonuses for bailed-out Wall Street Should Go To Zero” – this is sad. When America came out of the “Roaring 20’s”, President Hoover was in a compromised position of over-seeing a society that had lost its moral compass. The “Trend” was first and foremost for financial wealth. The “Trade”-off was the Great Depression. Today we don’t have that – but we do have much to fix.

Whether or not the folks at “Investment Banking Inc” pay themselves the bonus pool they have allegedly allocated to themselves or not this year is very much looking at the tree. The forest is being ‘You Tubed’ by Americans in their investment savings and portfolios. Every day that they are misled, America votes and sells these stocks lower. Chris Cox and his cronies can’t stop gravity. These over-geared financial firms have disintermediated themselves via short term compensation compromises. Now the process is in motion to replace them.

The US stock market is paying less and less attention to these horse and buggy whip “Investment Banks”, and starting to look beyond them. Goldman and Morgan Stanley can lose 5-10% of their value, daily, and people in this country are no longer surprised. Americans are a people of progress and change. They are done with the conflicts, the compromises, and the constraints of a financial system that lost its way. Old rules and said leaders of American financial institutions “are not necessarily sacred… principles are”… and if it wasn’t for that, I wouldn’t have my feet on the floor early every morning, charging our business forward.

Bottoms in markets are processes, not points. The change needed in this country will take time. That’s what investing has always been about. Take your time this morning. Read and reflect. This is not my gospel. These are the principles that great American Capitalism has always been built upon. God bless America’s families today, especially those who have lost loved ones serving our countries’ principles.

Keith R. McCullough

Long ETFs

JO – iPath Coffee –Vietnam and the Central African Republic have officially established diplomatic ties with a statement signed on Nov. 10th in Hanoi. Coffee is among the agricultural staples that is encompassed in the plan for economic cooperation.

EWL –iShares Switzerland- Julius Baer fell over 6% to a decline of 56% YTD. The largest remaining independent private Swiss bank announced a decrease in AUM due to outflows as well as investment decline.

EWA –iShares Australia- Australian business confidence reached a record low of -29 in October, down 21 points since September to the lowest recorded level.

EWG – iShares Germany – The ZEW survey of German investor confidence rose to -53.5 in November from -63 in October, an unexpectedly bullish move.

FXI – iShares China – Customs data shows exports increased 19.2% y-o-y in October, down from 21.5% in September. Imports rose just 15.6%, the lowest level since June 2007 bringing the trade surplus for the month to $35.2 billion. Industry group leaders expect tax rebates on copper and aluminum exports to be re-introduced in the near term,

VYM – Vanguard High Dividend Yield ETF – Revised AIG bailout terms spurred the Markit CDX North America Investment Grade index to decline slightly by 1 basis point to 186.5 in anticipation that carmakers may also receive capital injections.


Short ETFs

UUP – U.S. Dollar Index – The dollar rose against Latin American currencies as yields for the region declined.

EWW – iShares Mexico - Consorcio Ara SAB received authorization from regulators to proceed with its 26,000 home Citara project despite financing concerns.

EWJ – iShares Japan - The Economy Watchers index, a survey of sentiment among small business owners dropped to 22.6 for October, the lowest level since the survey began in 2001.

EWU – iShares United Kingdom – Leaders from the three primary political parties called for tax cuts to soften the recessionary blow. The pound reached 82.15 pence per EUR, an all-time low.

IFN – The India Fund – -- Stocks of state controlled refiners rose on news of a 4.6 billion infusion of government bonds to compensate them for losses created by subsidies. The Rupee fell 0.5% percent to 48.12 for the largest single day decrease in a month.

Keith R. McCullough
CEO & Chief Investment Officer



RRGB – Clarifying Conference call rhetoric

The impact of advertising;

Optimistic outlook from the conference call - “While the last of our 24 weeks of national advertising ends this--next week, we are very pleased with how guests have responded to our cable advertising this year. The economy may be tough right now, but the guests are telling us more than ever how much they love Red Robin, so we believe that our brand building efforts overall are working.”

In the 10Q things are less clear – “While we believe our brand health and sales are being positively impacted by this media, it is increasingly difficult to judge the effectiveness of advertising in an environment where consumers are pulling back on retail and restaurant spending.”

Looking at Cost of Sales;

On the conference call the company said “Our cost of sales increased by 80 basis points in the third quarter compared to last year. The increase was primarily due to higher raw materials costs in almost every category, somewhat offset by menu price increases, favorable produce and beverage costs, and some mix shift to higher margin menu items.”

In the 10Q the explanation for the increase in COGS was a little different; “cost of sales increased as a percentage of restaurant revenues over prior year due to higher raw material costs in almost every category and a slight shift in the mix of food versus beverage sales, with a decline in the sales of higher priced menu items and beverages, partially offset by menu price increases.”

I see things a little differently; RRGB reported that in 3Q08 same-store sales decreased 2.2% with traffic declining over 6%. Relative to the comment s in the 10Q, the same-store sales decline was also driven by people trading down to lower priced items. On the conference call, management indicated that consumers had shifted to higher margin menu items. For reference, the highest margin items on the menu are in the specialty beverage section so I find these two comments to be somewhat contradictory. How are consumer purchases shifting toward higher margin items, but also shifting away from higher priced menu items, including the high margin beverages?

Increasing rents;

Lastly, the 10Q mentioned that “many of the restaurants acquired from franchisees are ‘build to suit’ locations that typically bear a higher occupancy cost as a percentage of restaurant revenue.” As you can see from the chart, higher rents are going to be an issue for the company in a declining sales environment!

SP500 Levels Into the Close...

This market is hardly for the faint of heart. As we head lower, I'll be positioning to proactively prepare for the SP500 to make a lower high than that of October 27th (848). See chart and levels below:

BUY “Trade” = 888
BUY “Trade” breakout line (dotted green) = 951
SELL “Trade” line = 1007

KM

GET THE HEDGEYE MARKET BRIEF FREE

Enter your email address to receive our newsletter of 5 trending market topics. VIEW SAMPLE

By joining our email marketing list you agree to receive marketing emails from Hedgeye. You may unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in one of the emails.

Hats off to Kovner and Paulson!

John Paulson, that is...

According to the Bloomberg hedge fund performance article this morning, both Paulson's Advantage Plus Fund and Bruce Kovner's Caxton Global Fund are having fantastic years.

When we talk about "hedgies", we are not referring to the PM's out there who know how to manage risk. Paulson and Kovner are amongst those who are profiting from the "hedgies" groupthink.

Well done gentlemen, well done!
KM

Deflating the Chinese Inflation Chart...

Today's Chinese producer price inflation report was somewhat lost in the shuffle of the media's daily dance on the data point coals... but it shouldn't have been. On the margin, this was a material release.

China's PPI came in at +6.6% y/y (see chart). This is down materially from the +9.1% reported in September, and what now looks like it was a 12 year peak in August at +10.1% year over year.

If you are going to invest in equities, we suggest you do so globally. Combined with the $586B stimulus plan that the Chinese instituted this morning, decelerating inflation is a positive macro factor. This puts owning the Chinese etf (FXI) at the top of our global macro country investment list.
KM

TSN – Implications for the Chicken industry

TSN’s chicken segment reported operating losses of $91 million and $118 million for 4Q and FY08, respectively. These results were hurt primarily by higher grain costs, which increased $231 million in the fourth quarter and $593 million for the full year. Chicken prices moved in the right direction in Q4, up 5.5% YOY, but not enough to offset the magnitude of cost increases. And, the outlook for the first half of 2009 does not look much better.
Management has limited visibility on input costs going forward and supply issues remain a concern, but given current leg quarter and breast prices 6 weeks into the quarter, TSN expects to lose significant dollars in Q1 and could potentially lose money again in Q2. Egg sets have come down 10%, which is an indicator of future supply levels, but given the current pressures on demand, TSN does not think this reduction will be enough to return to profitability. Management stated that a lot depends on demand. Given the strength of the U.S. dollar, there will be increased pressure on export demand and there continues to be weakened demand from casual dining companies within the food service segment. Not surprising relative to the recent October same-store sales numbers we have been seeing from casual dining operators, TSN said casual dining demand has gotten significantly more discouraging in the October/November timeframe relative even to what it was seeing in August and September. All of these issues are industry issues so the challenges TSN is facing will also impact its chicken competitors.

TSN said it may take a quarter or two before the supply/price relationship comes into balance, but relative to its current environment, “ultimately this will not go on. It cannot go on forever. So there will be a time when these prices will materially rise, and that time frame is not years away. It's months away. Whether it's this quarter or next quarter or whether it has to wait till April or May, it is going to happen.” However, due to the volume of questions/concerns around the chicken segment, investors did not seem comforted by this statement. Management alluded to these concerns at the close of its earnings call when it said, “Let me just conclude by saying it's evident that on the chicken side, you all think we should be cutting production. I will tell you we will continue to monitor that, but I still believe that the improvements that we've put in place and what we are doing to match demand with supply is the right thing for Tyson Foods.”

Daily Trading Ranges

20 Proprietary Risk Ranges

Daily Trading Ranges is designed to help you understand where you’re buying and selling within the risk range and help you make better sales at the top end of the range and purchases at the low end.

next