Capital Brief: No Money, Mo' Problems For Trump?

Editor's Note: Below is a brief excerpt from Hedgeye Potomac Chief Political Strategist JT Taylor's Capital Brief sent to institutional clients each morning. For more information on how you can access our institutional research please email sales@hedgeye.com.

 

Capital Brief: No Money, Mo' Problems For Trump? - capital brief

NO MONEY, MO’ PROBLEMS:

Donald Trump’s finance team held its first official meeting amid concerns over the campaign’s lack of a finance team, infrastructure and coordination with the RNC with less than five months left to prepare for the general election. In most election cycles, fundraising for presidential campaigns starts 18 to 24 months out - and Trump will be at a disadvantage out of the gate given his continued controversies and general lack of enthusiasm among the Republican donor class leading many to question whether Trump can achieve his previously stated goal of raising $1 billion.

 

Donors are disturbed with the threadbare nature of his campaign which continues to struggle in carrying out even the most basic of functions. He lacks pollsters, data and field expertise, a policy-writing shop, and a communications apparatus - and will soon find that the general election is a different animal than the primary.

CLINTON’S CASH COW:

On the other hand, when it comes to fundraising, Hillary Clinton and the Democrats are running like a well-oiled machine. She’s spent well over $200 million, has a large campaign staff with seasoned veterans, and continues to pad her war chest every day. Additionally - with Clinton, well, being a Clinton - she enjoys a deep bench of supporters ready to fundraise, cut ads, hit the campaign trail, and utilize social media. When Bernie Sanders finally exits the race, she’ll look to tap into a deep reservoir of new (and smaller) donors padding her fundraising lead.

WARRENTED ENDORSEMENT:

In what may be an audition for the prototypical running mate, Elizabeth Warren launched another blistering attack on Donald Trump, the Republican party, and calls for Wall Street reform. Warren has been suggested as  Clinton’s veep choice by none other than Minority Leader Harry Reid, despite his warning on choosing a senator from a state with a Republican governor. The case for Warren is clear - she’s an outspoken populist-progressive leader who would rally the supporters of Bernie Sanders to Clinton’s cause.