TODAY’S S&P 500 SET-UP – August 26, 2014

As we look at today's setup for the S&P 500, the range is 35 points or 1.15% downside to 1975 and 0.60% upside to 2010.                                               













  • YIELD CURVE: 1.88 from 1.88
  • VIX closed at 11.7 1 day percent change of 2.01%


MACRO DATA POINTS (Bloomberg Estimates):         

  • 7:45am: ICSC weekly sales
  • 8:30am: Durable Goods, July, est. 8% (pr 0.7%, rev 1.7%)
  • 8:55am: Redbook weekly sales
  • 9am: FHFA House Price Index m/m, June, est. 0.3% (prior 0.4%)
  • 9am: S&P/Case Shiller 20-City m/m SA, June, est. 0.0% (pr -0.31%)
  • 10am: Consumer Confidence Index, Aug., est. 89 (prior 90.9)
  • 10am: Richmond Fed Manufacturing Index, Aug., est. 6 (prior 7)
  • 11:30am: U.S. to sell $50b 4W bills
  • 1:00pm: U.S. to sell $29b 2Y notes
  • 4:30pm: API weekly oil inventories



    • President Obama at American Legion convention, Charlotte, N.C.
    • Senate, House out on August recess
    • U.S. ELECTION WRAP: Primaries in Ariz., Fla.; Curtis Diary



  • Buffett said to help finance Burger King’s tax-saving deal
  • Ackman gains 30% in 2014 with Burger King, Herbalife wagers
  • Muni assets said to be excluded for U.S. bank liquidity rule
  • GM’s Chevrolet, Buick achieve sole gains in annual auto survey
  • GMO crop curbs overturned by judge in Hawaii: WSJ
  • Telefonica board said to discuss improving GVT bid this week
  • U.S. surveillance planes fly over Syria: AP sources
  • Putin set to meet Poroshenko as Ukraine border tension grows



    • Bank of Montreal (BMO CN) 7am, C$1.66 - Preview
    • Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS CN) 6am, C$1.41 - Preview
    • Best Buy (BBY) 7am, $0.31 - Preview
    • DSW (DSW) 7am, $0.32
    • Movado (MOV) 7am, $0.54
    • Sanderson Farms (SAFM) 6:30am, $3.80
    • Tech Data (TECD) 6am, $0.77



    • Analog Devices (ADI) 4:04pm, $0.63
    • Aruba Networks (ARUN) 4:05pm, $0.23
    • Bob Evans Farms (BOBE) 4:01pm, $0.10
    • Heico (HEI) 4:23pm, $0.44
    • Nimble Storage (NMBL) 4:05pm, $(0.16)
    • Smith & Wesson (SWHC) 4:05pm, $0.25
    • Solera (SLH) 4:08pm, $0.80
    • TiVo (TIVO) 4:01pm, $0.07



  • Hedge Fund Citrine Picks Zinc, Nickel as Best Base Metal Wagers
  • Iron Ore Risks Extending Drop as Price Falls to Lowest Since ‘12
  • Brazil Coffee Output Set for Worst Slump Since 1965: Commodities
  • Gold Climbs Most in Almost Three Weeks as Decline Spurs Buying
  • WTI Trades Near Seven-Month Low Before Supply Data; Brent Steady
  • China’s 2014 Copper Imports to Sustain Last Yr’s Pace: Antaike
  • Sanderson Profit Disappoints After It Misses Poultry Forecast
  • Turkey to Belarus Gold Reserves Said by IMF to Decrease in July
  • Raw Sugar Imports Rising 29% in Indonesia as Drinks Demand Booms
  • Soybean Futures Drop for Second Day to Lowest Since Sept. 2010
  • China Requires U.S. Govt GMO Certification for DDGS:
  • Corn Futures Seen Extending Decline to Year-End, UBS Says
  • Wells Fargo Sees Energy Rebound as Crude, Gas Weakness Temporary
  • Billionaires Lose Wealth as India Mine Permits Ruled Illegal
  • Nexen’s Buzzard Field Said Not to Have Restarted as Planned


























The Hedgeye Macro Team
















All Time Highs and No Volume

Client Talking Points


The total U.S. Equity Market Volume was -7% and -35% vs its 3 month and year-to-date averages yesterday, but the consensus short “hedge” (SPY, which we have not recommended) hit all-time highs on that as the Russell got back to breakeven for the year-to-date.


Now that we have the centrally planned bounce to lower-highs out of the way, the DAX is down -0.3% this morning after failing @Hedgeye TREND resistance of 9642 – we’re not buying that bounce; European economic data continues to slow.


Boring, yes – but staying long the Long Bond (TLT +16% year-to-date vs Russell 2000 flat) with #Q3Slowing in the U.S. remains our Best Macro Idea. Both the Markit PMI for AUG (58.5 vs 60.6 last) and JUL New Home Sales slowed yesterday.

Asset Allocation


Top Long Ideas

Company Ticker Sector Duration

Hologic is emerging from an extremely tough period which has left investors wary of further missteps. In our view, Hologic and its new management are set to show solid growth over the next several years. We have built two survey tools to track and forecast the two critical elements that will drive this acceleration.  The first survey tool measures 3-D Mammography placements every month.  Recently we have detected acceleration in month over month placements.  When Hologic finally receives a reimbursement code from Medicare, placements will accelerate further, perhaps even sooner.  With our survey, we'll see it real time. In addition to our mammography survey. We've been running a monthly survey of OB/GYNs asking them questions to help us forecast the rest of Hologic's businesses, some of which have been faced with significant headwinds. Based on our survey, we think those headwinds are fading. If the Affordable Care Act actually manages to reduce the number of uninsured, Hologic is one of the best positioned companies.


The level of activism in the restaurant industry has never been more rampant.  In the past year alone, we’ve seen CBRL, DAVE, DRI, BJRI and BOBE attract largely uninvited attention from these investors. BOBE has a long history of mismanagement, evidenced by flawed strategic rationale, an excessively bloated cost structure and severe underperformance relative to peers.  Fortunately, its poor operating performance presents a tremendous opportunity. After almost a year of pushing for change at Bob Evans, activist investor Sandell Asset Management is claiming a big victory. Activist investor Sandell won at least five seats on the board of the restaurant operator and food processor, based on preliminary results from the company’s annual shareholder meeting last week. This is precisely the sort of bullish catalyst that was central to our high conviction on BOBE.


Fixed income continues to be our favorite asset class, so it should come as no surprise to see us rotate into the Shares 20+ Year Treasury Bond Fund (TLT) on the long side. In conjunction with our #Q3Slowing macro theme, we think the slope of domestic economic growth is poised to roll over here in the third quarter. In the context of what may be flat-to-decelerating reported inflation, we think the performance divergence between Treasuries, stocks and commodities may actually be set to widen over the next two to three months. This view remains counter to consensus expectations, which is additive to our already-high conviction level in this position.  Fade consensus on bonds – especially as growth slows. As it’s done for multiple generations, the 10Y Treasury Yield continues to track the slope of domestic economic growth like a glove.

Three for the Road


On May 13 we identified 300 stores that $JCP needs to close - backed by detailed analysis.

JPM this week says 'JCP should close 300 stores'.



It’s better to look ahead and prepare than to look back and regret.

-Jackie Joyner Kersee


Coffee prices up another +0.6% yesterday to +65.1% year-to-date.

The Portals of Discovery

This note was originally published at 8am on August 12, 2014 for Hedgeye subscribers.

"Mistakes are the portals of discovery."

- James Joyce


There is nothing like a mistake to enhance our learning.  At times, defining a mistake can be a nuanced exercise.  For stock market operators, though, a mistake is very easy to define.  Simply: if a stock price goes against you meaningfully and over a sustainable period, you are wrong.


The most successful investors are often those investors that are effective at both learning from and minimizing their mistakes.  Many successful portfolio managers implement a stop loss so as to ensure that their mistakes are minimized. Others buy value plays with little perceived downside to minimize mistakes.


About a year ago, we introduced Hedgeye’s Best Idea list.  The idea of the list was to focus our research team on developing deep dive investment ideas with asymmetric reward characteristics. Overall, the list has had some really strong performers.  Not surprisingly we’ve also had some stocks that have not performed very well.  Due to a light global macro calendar this morning, we are going to do a deep dive on one of our very public “mistakes”.


Back to the Global Macro Grind . . .


Yesterday, one of our Best Ideas, Short Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (KMP), went against us and decidedly so.   Rich Kinder, the CEO and Company’s namesake, decided to consolidate the group of companies that existed under the Kinder Morgan umbrella.  In the announced deal, KMI, the C-Corp GP, will acquired its two MLPs, KMP/KMR and EPB in a ~$71B transaction comprised of 56% KMI equity, 38% assumed debt, and 6% cash.  


On one hand, it is worth applauding Kinder for this move.  After a long and successful run, we thought he was out of tricks, but he wasn’t. On the other hand, in implementing this dramatic corporate restructuring, Kinder readily acknowledged our thesis, which was that transparency was limited, cost of capital was very high, and growth options were limited for the Kinder Morgan complex.  And by bidding for our favored short of the group, KMP, at premium, he also marked the idea against us by about 15%.


It doesn’t matter that we’ve had some great calls on other MLPS, such as Linn Energy (LNCO) and Boardwalk Partners (BWP), on KMP we are now seriously in the red.  As always though, the question is what to do with the stock from here (even if you have been long and taking the other side of our trade it is worth considering).  As my colleague Kevin Kaiser writes:


“On 2014 Pro Forma (“PF”) metrics, we have PF KMI valued at 17x EV/EBITDA, 24x EV/EBIT, 27x market cap/pre-tax earnings. If we strip out the E&P segment at a $5.5B valuation ($1.0B of EBITDA x 5.5x multiple), PF KMI Midstream is valued at 19x EV/EBITDA. On an absolute basis, the valuation multiples are very high, in our opinion (19x EBITDA for a capital intensive, fully-taxable, highly-leveraged business), but even relative to peers, PF KMI seems mispriced here. EPD – which is not subject to federal income taxes – is valued at 17x EV/EBITDA, two EBITDA turns below PF KMI Midstream”


Combined with this egregious valuation is the more interesting point of KMI’s ability (or inability) to pay out its massive distribution going forward.  As Kevin also writes:


“On a cash flow basis, assuming a full tax shield, PF KMI will generate ~$5.3B/year in operating cash flow. Run-rate total CapEx is ~$4.1B/year (excluding Trans Mountain), putting run-rate, pre-tax Free Cash Flow at $1.2B, or $0.56 per PF KMI share. PF KMI is trading at a 1.4% pre-tax FCF yield. Its annual distribution burden will be $4.3B starting in 2015, putting its annual funding gap around $3.1B. These are rough metrics, but a good guide for how much capital PF KMI will need to raise on a go-forward basis.”


In the Early Look today, we’ve included two charts.  The first chart is a comp table that Kinder Morgan showed in their presentation yesterday comparing KMI against blue chip companies with growing dividends.  Included in the table are companies like McDonald’s, Cisco, Altria and so on.  The title of the table is quite explicit, “KMI Compares Favorable to its Mid-Stream Energy Peers and S&P 500 High Dividend Companies.”  Since the Company is guiding us to 10% dividend growth and a yield of 4.5%, on these basic metrics, KMI does look great!  But beauty, as always, is in the eye of the beholder. 

The Portals of Discovery - KMI Table


In the second chart in today’s note, we’ve included, “The Comp Table KMI Didn’t Publish.”  In this table we look at payout ratios, valuation metrics, and leverage ratios.  Far be it from us to question someone who yesterday made more money then we will perhaps every make, but we do think it is important to consider KMI’s risk profile in the context of some basic financial metrics.


The Portals of Discovery - COD KMI Comp Table


Now perhaps we’ve lost all credibility because we didn’t see this corporate restructuring coming (we thought Kinder Morgan was in a proverbial box), but if you are contemplating owning KMI here, you do need to take the Company’s advice and look at your options, like S&P 500 high dividend companies. 


On a basic level, would you rather own a company like Cisco that grows its dividend at ~7.9%, trades at ~6.0x EBITDA, and has $30 billion in net cash, or a company with the financial profile of KMI that trades ~19.0x EV/EBITDA, has debt/EBITDA at 5.5x, and has a dividend payout ratio of 130 – 200%.  Perhaps we are just simpletons, but to us the answer is obvious.


Keep your head up and stick on the ice,


Daryl G. Jones

Director of Research

the macro show

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CHART OF THE DAY: Hedgeye Housing Compendium, Not Good

Takeaway: We look at everything in rate of change terms. The color coding of red means bad.

CHART OF THE DAY: Hedgeye Housing Compendium, Not Good - Compendium 082614

Party Time!

“Party like it’s 1999!”



With Total US Equity Market Volume down -35% versus its 2014 average yesterday, breadth weak (only 59% of stocks were up on the day), I kind of felt bad. As my fishing buddies know, I like to party – but that was a pretty underwhelming “SPX 2000!” party.


Cause they say two thousand zero zero…

Party over, oops out of time

So tonight I’m gonna party like it’s 1999


In other news, Amazon is buying Twitch for $970M in cash this morning and Morgan Stanley is going to take Hubspot (HUBS) public. US initial public offerings (in both number of issues and dollars raised) for 2014 are now at their highest level since the internet bubble (1999). No worries.


Party Time! - prince 1999


Back to the Global Macro Grind


I’ve had an interesting career in that I’ve had the opportunity to be held accountable to risk managing two epic US stock market bubbles (1999 and 2007). Newsflash: as you are hitting the highs, almost everything looks like a long and your shorts suck.


Then, one by one, this thing called the cycle comes along and starts to take down some of the early cycle stocks. While I am sure being long Go Bro (GPRO), FireEye (FEYE), or Biotech (IBB) was fun yesterday, the Transports (IYT), Semis (SMH) and Housing (ITB) stocks were actually down.


Unlike high-short-interest momentum stocks that were up on the latest central plan to ban European economic gravity, some of these early cycle sectors were down on reality:


  1. US Markit PMI reading for AUG slowed to 58.5 (vs. 60.6 in JUL)
  2. US New Home Sales for JUL slowed -2.4% m/m (slowing for the 2nd straight month)


To be fair, despite falling interest rates, not as many Americans are either able or in the mood to lever themselves up on a new home these days. With cost of living running right around the all-time highs, many of your median income earning neighbors are broke too.


Rather than rant qualitatively about how bad housing demand is, today I have attached the Hedgeye Housing Compendium as the Chart of The Day. Since we look at everything in rate of change terms, the color coding of red means bad.


But, Keith, dude, look at the no-volume-squeeze in spoos – how bad is bad?

(*refer to how bad the US economy was getting in Q3 of 2007 when the SP500 didn’t stop going up until October for details)


Oil, Corn, and Wheat are straight down now, but for those of you still paying all-time-highs in US Rents (34% of Americans rent and rent represents 29% of the median consumer’s cost of living), and drinking coffee or eating meat, please ignore the following commodity update:


  1. Coffee prices up another +0.6% yesterday to +65.1% YTD
  2. Cattle prices up another +0.4% yesterday to +13.3% YTD
  3. Wheat prices down another -1.7% yesterday to -10.4% YTD


Yep, if you want to be bullish on the US Consumer (after 62 months of US economic expansion) as Boris (Woody Allen) said in Love and Death, “wheat – all there is in life is wheat” (VIDEO


If you’re not into cream of wheat, both the CRB Food Index and the Long Bond (TLT) are +16% YTD, btw. That certainly crushes being long early cycle growth style factors in US Equities like Housing and the Russell 2000 (IWM).


Oh, and then there’s what got this party started yesterday in US Equity Futures – moarrr central planning from the Europeans. How’s that follow through, worldwide, looking this morning?


  1. Most of Asian Equity markets were down overnight (China -1%, Japan -0.6%, Indonesia -0.6%, India -0.4%)
  2. All of the European major equity indices are failing @Hedgeye TREND resistance
  3. The consensus hedge (SPX Index and Emini futures and options contracts) isn’t up


Even if the SPX was up, I wouldn’t entirely disagree with the why. Don’t forget that the SP500 looks as slow-growth-yield-chasing as it ever has, and while I much prefer being long the Long Bond (TLT) than SPY in 2014, I’m more focused on shorting early cycle small-mid-cap stocks.


If your boss is forcing you to buy something at the all-time highs in SPY, I’d opt for being long big to mega cap liquidity. Why? That’s easy. When this bubble starts to blow (up), you want to be able to get out.


From my analysts, here’s a Top 3 list of big caps that both they and my risk management signals still like:


  1. Capital One (COF) – Josh Steiner
  2. HCA Holdings (HCA) – Tom Tobin
  3. Texas Instruments (TXN) – Craig Berger


If you want to lever yourself up long on early cycle small-mid caps and/or European equities here, have at it! It’s a party. “Say it one more time – two thousand zero zero …” and it’s time to party like we are running out of time.


Our immediate-term Global Macro Risk Ranges are now:


UST 10yr Yield 2.34-2.44%


RUT 1135-1172


VIX 11.21-13.37

EUR/USD 1.31-1.33


Best of luck out there today,



Keith R. McCullough
Chief Executive Officer


Party Time! - Compendium 082614

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