The Best of This Week From Hedgeye

Takeaway: Here's a quick look at some of the top videos, cartoons, market insights and more from Hedgeye this past week.

HEDGEYE TV

 

Helegeye is excited to welcome Craig Berger, our new Semiconductor Analyst and Technology Sector Head. Below Craig touches on his extensive resume, his research process, and highlights a few of his favorite names in the space.

 

CARTOON

WHO DO YOU TRUST?

 

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The Best of This Week From Hedgeye - cartoon

CHART

We believe we’ve identified one of Wall Street’s current darlings and recently added it to the Hedgeye Best Ideas list as a short.

 

The Best of This Week From Hedgeye - chart of the day

POLL

In today’s Morning Newsletter Keith McCullough wrote, “While it might work in disruptive technologies, devaluing history, time, and cycles rarely works in Macro…  ‘so’, let’s embrace the uncertainty born out of these measurable risk factors and get on with Q3.”

 

As Q2 month-end markups end today and as June stands as one of the lowest equity volume months in U.S.  we wanted to know what your thoughts were heading into the third quarter.

 

Today’s Poll Question Asked: Are you bullish or bearish on U.S. equities for the third quarter?

 

In the video below Director of Research Daryl Jones highlights the top three reasons why he is decidedly BEARISH on U.S. Equities for the third quarter.

 

 

At the time of this post, 51% voted BULLISH, 49% voted for BEARISH.

 

Those who would are optimistic about what the third quarter holds and are BULLISH on U.S. Equities had this to say:

  • Hard to be bearish on the equity market as a whole. There are certain sectors that are significantly outperforming. Record amount of assets under management, easing Fed, life is good when investing with other people's money. I'll buy all the stocks with VIX at 10, as long as I get paid. Greed is good.
  • Consumer spending compares get easier in 2H (the second half of the year). The worst performing stocks in the market through six months have almost all been consumer discretionary. If this group simply ceases to be putrid, it should be positive on the margin for the broader market.
  • Until the Fed stops propping up the market, I can't bet against it. I don’t want to fight the Fed.

 

Voters who are BEARISH on U.S. Equities for 3Q reasoned:

  • Bearish for a 10% reversion to mean without hurting major uptrend.  Reasons: XLY:XLU ratio trending sideways to downward on 1 month, 4-6 month and 1 yr period, all while JNK:TLT outperformance has slowed on those same periods.
  • Too much complacency out there, no volume, inflation cutting into consumer spending, growth forecasts being revised downward with room for consensus to continue to chase growth to the downside with future revisions...
  • Inflation creeping up, economy slowing down, jobs being created are not permanent, increasing disconnection between stock prices and economic reality... see and increasing movement of funds to commodities.
  • The third quarter contains September which historically is the worst month for the markets - so sideways trading in light volume until the tick down in Sept.

 

 UNLOCKED

 

Solid report overall as NFP goes >200K for five months in a row for 1st time since Jan 2000 (although that wasn’t a particularly positive harbinger), employment gains were broad based, the Unemployment rate flirts with a 5-handle, and the U-6 and total LT unemployed continued to decline. 

 

On the other side, total part-time and involuntary part-time both increased significantly while the slope in private wage growth remained negative – with real earnings growth likely to be negative for a second month in June. 

 

The Best of This Week From Hedgeye - drake1

 

THE GOOD:

  • NFP:  Solid Report with NFP = +288, Private = +262, 2Mo Revision = +29K
  • Household Survey:  Net gain of +407K in June with Employment growth accelerating across all age buckets except 20-24 YOA
  • Unemployment Rate:  Unemployment Rate dropped to 6.1% from 6.3% prior alongside the +407K increase in total Employed and a -325K decrease in Total Unemployed
  • U6/LT Unemployed:  U-6 Unemployment dropped to 12.1% from 12.2% while the ranks of the long-term unemployed dropped -293K MoM on an absolute and -1.8% to 32.8% as a % of total
  • State & Local Government Employment:  increased for a 10th consecutive month in June while the rate of job loss at the Federal level improved 10bps sequentially to -2.0% YoY.  Aggregate government salary and wage growth has finally begun to contribute positively to aggregate disposable income growth in recent months 
  • Initial Claims:  The employment data has followed the steady improvement in the initial jobless claims data in recent months and this mornings update to claims was again positive with both headline rolling claims and the YoY rate of improvement in NSA claims holding near the best levels YTD. 

 

WAGE GROWTH:  Average hourly earnings in the Private sector grew 2.0% YoY, down from +2.1% in May and continuing the stagnant 2.0% +/- 20bps that has prevailed over the last two years.  Average hourly earnings for Production and Nonsupervisory employees also decelerated -10bps to +2.29% YoY.   

 

With nominal earnings growth static, real earnings growth likely to be negative for a 2nd month in June with the official release, and the spread between spending and earnings growth having re-expanded the last couple quarters, we continue to think the upside to consumption growth remains constrained in the immediate/intermediate term – particularly if inflation continues to march northward and the savings rate remains at current levels.  

 

WAGE RAGE:  Wage Growth Refuses To Accelerate, Does it Matter To The Policy Outlook?  

Conventionally, wages are viewed as a lagging indicator, with wage inflationary pressure building as the labor supply declines and the economy moves towards constrained capacity.  There’s a view that the FOMC won’t move to raise rates so long as real wage growth is flat or declining, which it is currently. 

 

It’s somewhat difficult to make a particularly cogent empirical argument in either direction, however.  The longest historical dataset for (real) wages is that for Production & NonSupervisory Employees which goes back to 1964 (the BLS series for total private employment reported inside the NFP release only dates back to 2006). 

 

The problem with using this series stems from the well documented, secular plight of middle and low income earners where flat/negative real wage growth has characterized the last four decades.  

 

In fact, the current post-recessionary trend in real wage growth compares favorably with those observed over the last half century.   

 

We’d agree that the collective policy bias of the current FOMC body argues for dovish conservatism in the face of negative real wage growth alongside sub-target, or moderately above target, inflation levels.  

 

THE WORST EVER...& EVER IS STILL A PRETTY LONG TIME  

The painstakingly slow progression of growth out of the Great Recession has been exhaustingly documented and the duo of negative post-recession GDP prints observed in 1Q13 and 1Q11 sit as the two worst of any post-war recession with a recovery greater than 61 months (the duration of the current expansion).    

 

The five month run of positive labor market data has been encouraging - though not fully corroborated by broad macro strength post the immediate weather-distortion bounce. 

 

We’d advise keeping growth optimism anchored over the intermediate as growth compares get harder and inflation comps easier in 3Q and the conflation of rising inflation, static nominal wage growth, and an ongoing deceleration in housing should drive a sequential deceleration in domestic economic growth.  

 

The reality of the intermediate/LT is that household balance sheets remain over levered, demographics are going the wrong way,  and policy driven increases in inequality will continue to feed the growing phantasm that is the U.S.  middle class. 

 

Yellen’s acute attention to the prospects for secular stagnation and hysteresis isn't misplaced. 

 

Enjoy the Holiday Weekend,

 

 

Christian B. Drake

cdrake@hedgeye.com

@HedgeyeUSA

 

 


 


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