prev

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK

TODAY’S S&P 500 SET-UP – November 27, 2013


As we look at today's setup for the S&P 500, the range is 14 points or 0.43% downside to 1795 and 0.35% upside to 1809.                                                            

                                                                   

SECTOR PERFORMANCE

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 1

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 2

 

EQUITY SENTIMENT:

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 10                                                                                                                                                                  

 

CREDIT/ECONOMIC MARKET LOOK:

  • YIELD CURVE: 2.43 from 2.42
  • VIX closed at 12.81 1 day percent change of 0.16%

MACRO DATA POINTS (Bloomberg Estimates):

  • 7am: MBA Mortgage Applications, Nov. 22 (prior -2.3%)
  • 8:30am: Init. Jobless Claims, Nov. 23, est. 330k (pr 323k)
  • 8:30am: Durable Goods, Oct., est. -2% (pr 3.7%, rev 3.8%)
  • 8:30am: Chicago Fed Natl Activity, Oct., est. 0.1% (pr 0.14)
  • 9:45am: Chicago Purch Mgrs Index, Nov., est. 60 (pr 65.9)
  • 9:45am: Bloomberg Consumer Comfort, Nov. 24 (prior -34.6)
  • 9:55am: U of Mich Conf., Nov. final, est. 73.1 (prior 72)
  • 10am: Freddie Mac mortgage rates
  • 10am: Index of Leading Eco Ind., Oct., est. 0.0% (pr 0.7%)
  • 10:30am: DOE Energy Inventories
  • 12pm: EIA natural-gas storage change
  • 1pm: Baker Hughes rig count

GOVERNMENT:

    • House, Senate not in session
    • 10am: Consumer Federation of America, Credit Union Natl Assn event on Holiday Consumer Spending Survey

WHAT TO WATCH:

  • Hewlett-Packard sales top ests. on corporate demand
  • HP, Whitman lose bid to dismiss investor suit over Autonomy
  • Gensler gives Wall Street 2 mos. to meet cross-border policy
  • JPMorgan pressured to reveal $13b accord complaint
  • Crocs said to discuss investment w/funds including Blackstone
  • Japan to issue icing risk warning to JAL on Boeing 787 engine
  • Position for volatility on Mon. after Black Fri., Goldman says
  • IMF may shift more bailout risk to bondholders, NYT says
  • Microsoft’s Skype enters new China JV w/GMF, China Daily says
  • Symantec to end struggling data-storage service amid overhaul
  • Morgan Stanley hiring in China being probed by DOJ: Reuters
  • KKR’s Bis Industries scraps plan for Australian share sale
  • ANA, Japan Air fly through new China zone without notice
  • German consumer confidence to rise to highest since Aug. 2007
  • U.K. economic growth accelerates on investment, homebuilding

 EARNINGS:

    • Golar LNG (GLNG) Bef-mkt, $0.41
    • Golar LNG Partners (GMLP) Bef-mkt, $0.60

COMMODITY/GROWTH EXPECTATION (HEADLINES FROM BLOOMBERG)

  • WTI-Brent Spread Widens for Sixth Day as U.S. Stockpiles Climb
  • Zeppelins Seen Hauling Caterpillars to Mine Siberia: Commodities
  • China Gold Imports From Hong Kong Rise to 2nd Highest on Record
  • Soybeans Reach Two-Month High as Demand Seen for U.S. Supplies
  • Copper Rises as Premiums and Stockpiles Indicate Steady Demand
  • Rebar Drops on Slowing Demand Ahead of Industrial Profit Data
  • Rubber Falls to 2-Week Low as U.S. Confidence Data Weaken Demand
  • Codelco Said to Raise Korea Copper Premium to Nine-Year High
  • U.S. Oil Glut Seen in 2015 as Export Ban Tested: Energy Markets
  • Energy Market at Mercy of Wars, Fed as Year Dawns: 2014 Outlook
  • Gold Heading for 2013 Low as Haven Demand Ebbs: Chart of the Day
  • Illegal Coal Mines Leave Hundreds Dead in Ukraine’s East: Energy
  • China May Delay U.S. Corn Buying as Cargo Held, Shanghai JC Says
  • Crude Traders Skeptical Iran Deal Will Bolster Oil Supplies

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 5

 

CURRENCIES

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 6

 

GLOBAL PERFORMANCE

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 3

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 4

 

EUROPEAN MARKETS

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 7

 

ASIAN MARKETS

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 8

 

MIDDLE EAST

 

THE HEDGEYE DAILY OUTLOOK - 9

 

 

The Hedgeye Macro Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE?

Takeaway: Right now may be a bit early, but gold is shaping up to be a compelling long idea heading into 2014.

CONCLUSION: Keith summed up our latest thoughts on gold in a brief @HedgeyeTV video this afternoon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COWDQhsI3jI. The note below expands upon those high-level thoughts in greater detail, including our updated cyclical outlook for the US economy.

 

Since the start of NOV, Keith has been trading gold with a bullish bias in our Real-Time Alerts signaling product. This has been a marked shift from having traded gold with a largely bearish bias since late 2011.

 

From a fundamental perspective, we now anticipate the emergence of distinct tailwinds that are increasingly likely to materialize over the intermediate term. As we detailed in last Friday’s Early Look, we think the most probable cyclical GIP outlook for the US economy is as follows:

 

  1. #GrowthSlowing: We think monetary and fiscal policy uncertainty (mostly monetary policy uncertainty) will weigh on consumer and business confidence. Furthermore, GDP comps get difficult as CPI/GDP deflator comps get easier, at the margins.
  2. #InflationAccelerating: We think domestic disinflation is now a rear-view phenomenon as easy comps and a weak dollar provide upward pressure on CPI and PPI readings.
  3. #IndefinitelyDovish Monetary Policy: We are increasingly of the view that the Fed is aware of the systemic risk present in the bond market and is potentially setting up to never commence tapering. They will likely accomplish this by setting far-too-aggressive targets for GDP growth and shifting their focus to combating a perceived risk of deflation, at the margins.

 

CLICK HERE to review the analysis supporting these conclusions in its entirety.

 

With regards to points #1 and #2, the confluence of #GrowthSlowing and #InflationAccelerating puts an economy squarely in Quad #3 on our GIP model:

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 1

 

Historically, moves by the US into Quad #3 have been bullish for the price of gold, as both the US dollar and real interest rates tend to decline in this economic “state”; the opposite holds true on a move into Quad #1 (i.e. #GrowthAccelerating as #InflationAccelerates), which is where both the reported data and consensus expectations have tracked throughout much of 2013. Given where we’ve been on growth and inflation for much of the year, it would be modest to say that we are not surprised to see gold down almost -26% YTD (we’ve been the bears on gold for much of the past 12-18M).

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 2

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 3

 

Again, we think monetary and fiscal policy uncertainty (mostly monetary policy uncertainty) will weigh on consumer and business confidence and we’re already starting to see that in the high-frequency data:

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 4

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 5

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 6

 

That brings us squarely to point #3 as laid out above: we think Janet Yellen will prove to be the Mother-Of-All-Doves and, perhaps more importantly, we don’t think consensus agrees with this view. The latter point can be seen squarely in the aggregate futures and options positioning amongst speculators (the market has swung heavily into a net short bet on LT Treasuries):

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 7

 

With regards to how the Fed might get there, we continue to think they are out-to-lunch (i.e. way too high) with respect to their 2013E and 2014E GDP growth forecasts. Moreover, they are well below consensus on their 2013 and 2014 inflation estimates and the confluence of both gives them scope to:

 

  1. Not feel any pressure to taper in the next few months (because of the perceived “threat” of deflation); and
  2. Reset market expectations in the following months for when tapering will likely commence to consistently later-than-expected start dates (because growth, and the labor market, will likely surprise their expectations to the downside).

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 8

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 9

 

There are two caveats to the aforementioned charts:

 

  1. Our forecasts for growth and inflation in 2013E and 2014E are not locked in and are highly subject to change as new data feeds into the algorithm. What our GIP model is designed to do is provide a manageable range for the most probable directional adjustment(s) from the base rate in the absence of incremental evidence. Unlike traditional economic models, we don’t subscribe to the lick-your-finger method of making groundless assumptions about the future state(s) of the economy. Rather, we prefer to let market-based signals and fundamental (i.e. high-frequency) data guide our expectations on a rolling basis.
  2. The Fed’s forecasts for inflation are for the Core PCE Price Index, not headline CPI. It is very likely that Core PCE does not materially blow through the upside of the Fed’s official target given that: A) the target is a healthy +2% (and potentially higher if they decide to move the goalposts again); and B) there won’t be a ton of upside pressure on the rate of core inflation (via pass-through costs) if headline inflation isn’t projected to come in much higher than that.

 

All told, we think a waning threat of tapering, at the margins, is likely to serve as a positive catalyst for the price of gold – and other inflation hedge assets – over the intermediate term. The following chart, put together by our very own Christian Drake, highlights the causal relationship between #TaperTalk and the precipitous decline in the price of gold over the LTM:

 

GOLD: IS IT TIME TO GET BACK IN ON THE LONG SIDE? - 10

 

Are you prepared for Janet Yellen to be a lot more dovish than the market currently thinks she will be? History would side with those of you who are, in fact, getting prepared for just that. The following is an excerpt from a late-2005 speech she gave on the housing bubble to the Conference on US Monetary Policy:

 

  • “How, then, should monetary policy react to unusually high prices of houses—or of other assets, for that matter?... The debate lies in determining when, if ever, policy should be focused on deflating the asset price bubble itself.”
  • “In my view, it makes sense to organize one’s thinking around three consecutive questions—three hurdles to jump before pulling the monetary policy trigger. First, if the bubble were to deflate on its own, would the effect on the economy be exceedingly large? Second, is it unlikely that the Fed could mitigate the consequences? Third, is monetary policy the best tool to use to deflate a house-price bubble?”
  • “My answers to these questions in the shortest possible form are, “no,” “no,” and “no.””
  • “In answer to the first question on the size of the effect, it could be large enough to feel like a good-sized bump in the road, but the economy would likely to be able to absorb the shock.”
  • “In answer to the second question on timing, the spending slowdown that would ensue is likely to kick in gradually, because it mainly affects household wealth… So the impact of a gradual spending slowdown could well be cushioned by an easier policy.”
  • “In answer to the third question on whether monetary policy is the best tool to deflate a house-price bubble, there are several points to consider. For one thing, no one can predict exactly how much tightening would be needed, or by exactly how much the bubble should be reduced. Beyond that, a tighter policy to deflate a housing bubble could impose substantial costs on other sectors of the economy that would lead to equally unwelcome imbalances.”
  • “Taking all of these points into consideration, it seems that the arguments against trying to deflate a bubble outweigh those in favor of it. So, my bottom line is that monetary policy should react to rising prices for houses or other assets only insofar as they affect the central bank’s goal variables—output, employment, and inflation.”

 

CLICK HERE to access the full transcript of the speech.

 

Alas, if you thought her predecessor was cool with inflating the bond bubble and all the other intended and unintended #BernankeBubbles, then, by the looks of it, you haven’t seen anything yet. That is, of course, assuming a 67-year-old woman who’s been doing and saying the same exact things for ~50 years doesn’t have a massive change of heart upon taking office as the world’s most important government official – if not human being.

 

In the history of central planning, crazier things have happened, though. Stay tuned…

 

Darius Dale

Associate: Macro Team


$RTSI: PUTIN POWER (NOT SO MUCH)

Takeaway: Live by oil, die by oil.

"Putin Power" (or lack thereof) is turning into an interesting story yet again as the price of Oil makes a series of lower-highs and Ukrainians go after the pro-Russia central planning thing.

 

The Russian stock market leads the losers this morning down -0.8%. Russia is down over -3% year-to-date.

 

Live by oil, die by oil.

 

$RTSI: PUTIN POWER (NOT SO MUCH) - Putin Power

 

Editor's note: This is a brief excerpt from Hedgeye Research earlier this morning. For more information on how you can subscribe click here.


Early Look

daily macro intelligence

Relied upon by big institutional and individual investors across the world, this granular morning newsletter distills the latest and most vital market developments and insures that you are always in the know.


Diaper Dandies: Class of 2013

Takeaway: Today's Chart of the Day highlights the deal and performance metrics for the current freshman class of a resurgent, domestic IPO market

With animal spirits kindled and speculative appetites wetted in 2013 alongside bullish price momentum and higher all-time highs in equities, the domestic IPO market has been resurgent.  

 

Together with the positive price action, the macro backdrop has been favorable for shares coming to market as volatility spikes have been transient, equity fund flows have been positive and persistent and the trend in consumer and CEO confidence (pre-Gov’t shutdown) has been decidedly positive YTD.   

 

In the summary table below we highlight the deal and performance metrics for the 2013 class of U.S. IPO’s.  Both transaction volume and proceeds have accelerated in the YTD as deal pricing has been solid with positive, subsequent absolute and market adjusted performance for the preponderance of new issues. 

 

Strong returns for household names, FB and TWTR, which are currently +18% and +50% above offer, respectively, have helped invigorate retail involvement and will likely  continue to support individual interest in the (still) pregnant pipeline of forthcoming VC and PE backed offloads.    

 

Our GLL team expects the next high profile IPO, Hilton hotels, to price before year end and will be doing a pre-IPO blackbook and conference call in the next couple weeks to detail their investment view on the offering.  Please contact if you are interested in that call. 

 

At present, the environment remains favorable for extending the positive acceleration in new equity issuance and broader corporate activity/M&A, but speculative appetite (& confidence) anchors on last price.   

 

From a price signaling perspective, the TREND lines that matter are 1718 Support on the SPX and 14.29 Resistance on the VIX.

 

Diaper Dandies: Class of 2013 - Diaper Dandies Class of 2013

 

 

Christian B. Drake

Associate 


Bond Kings @PIMCO Face Dismal Year

Takeaway: PIMCO's Bill Gross and the other big bond boys are experiencing some performance issues this year.

Bond Kings @PIMCO Face Dismal Year - bgross

 

The broader issue with bond managers like PIMCO is how far afield they have journeyed in search of yield. And therein lies the key question: At what cost does this hunt for yield come?

 

As it relates to the PIMCO Total Return Fund, prospective underperformance may even be more concerning given the fund's holdings and where the managers have gone to find yield. According to analysis by our Financials Team here at Hedgeye, almost 34% of PIMCO Total Returns holdings are in agency Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS). Check out the chart below highlighting the spread of agency MBS to the 10-year Treasury Yield.

 

Bond Kings @PIMCO Face Dismal Year - chart for fortune

 

Prior to the financial crisis, this spread was around 126 basis points. It has now narrowed to approximately 68 basis points. In other words, the almighty chase for yield has effectively priced mortgage backed securities to one of the lowest levels of risk that we've seen in the asset class. Even if the spread for Agency MBS normalized by just 50 basis points, to pre-crisis levels, it would have a meaningful impact on the market. By our estimation, allowing for modified duration, a 50 basis increase (reversal of tapering for instance) in yield would lead to 5% downside in the Agency MBS market.

 

Editor's note: This is an excerpt from an article in Fortune written by Daryl Jones, Director of Research at Hedgeye. Click here to read it in its entirety. 

 

 


real-time alerts

real edge in real-time

This indispensable trading tool is based on a risk management signaling process Hedgeye CEO Keith McCullough developed during his years as a hedge fund manager and continues to refine. Nearly every trading day, you’ll receive Keith’s latest signals - buy, sell, short or cover.

next