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Nike Punk'd Adidas

Takeaway: The logo wars heated up this week when a new star Bayern Munich player (Adidas team) wore a huge Swoosh in his first press conference.

This note was originally published July 05, 2013 at 13:53 in Retail

Things NOT to do on your first day on the job...appear in a PR photo with your new employer while wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the logo of its nemesis. 

 

Nike Punk'd Adidas - punk

 

Bayern Munich is one of Adidas' top endorsed football clubs, and their new hot-shot midfielder -- Mario Goetze -- sported a Nike T-shirt during his first press conference as a Bayern Munich player on Tuesday. It wasn't even a shirt with a subtle Nike logo on the sleeve or the upper right crest. It was a massive, borderline obnoxious, full-frontal Nike assault.

 

You can bet that someone at Adidas got fired over that miss. 


MACAU: STRONG START TO JULY

There is no change to our YoY GGR projection of 18-22% growth for July following a solid start to the month.  Through the first 7 days, table revenues averaged a strong HK$919 million per day, up 24% YoY and 5% versus June 2013.  Anecdotal indications are that both VIP and Mass traffic contributed to the start.

 

Market shares are pretty much irrelevant so early in the month but as you can see from the table below, MGM and LVS were the biggest gainers from trend.  MPEL and Wynn were the laggards.  In terms of the stocks, we continue to like MPEL and MGM.

 

MACAU: STRONG START TO JULY - macau1

 

MACAU: STRONG START TO JULY - macau2


Morning Reads on Our Radar Screen

Takeaway: A quick look at stories on Hedgeye's radar screen.

Keith McCullough – CEO

Egypt unrest: Tensions soar amid Cairo killings (via BBC)

IMF May Cut Global Growth Forecast as Emerging Markets Slow (via Bloomberg)

Japan Mergers Fall to Nine-Year Low as Yen Volatility Surges (via Bloomberg)

China ex-rail minister given suspended death sentence (via BBC)

 

Morning Reads on Our Radar Screen - earth2

 

Josh Steiner – Financials

Corzine off the crook: No criminal charges (via New York Post)

Bond investors face a reckoning as interest rates jump (via Los Angeles Times)

 

Daryl Jones - Macro

China Cash Squeeze Seen Creating Vietnam-Size Credit Hole (via Bloomberg)

 

Matt Hedrick - Macro

German economy struggles as exports and output tumble (via Reuters)

 

Kevin Kaiser – Energy

Deadly Train Derailment Fuels Crude-by-Rail Concerns (via WSJ)

 

Jonathan Casteleyn – Financials

Crowded ETF Exit Proving Costly as Bonds Trail: Credit Markets (via Bloomberg)

 

Tom Tobin – Healthcare

Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: June 2013 (via KFF.org)


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July 8, 2013

July 8, 2013 - 7 8 2013 7 59 11 AM


MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S.

Takeaway: Asian risk continues to rise while the U.S. looks to be on stabler footing vis-a-vis Friday's jobs report. #RatesRising

Key Takeaways:

Asia continues to be a rising source of risk with both China and India showing growing pressure in their respective banking systems. Chinese banks posted another week of sharp increases in their default swaps. Here are Keith's morning comments on Asia: 

 

CHINA – ugly start to the week for Asian Equities, led lower by Indonesia -3.2% and China -2.4% (Hang Seng -1.3%); Shanghai Comp = -11.7% YTD and every Asian country is bearish TREND @Hedgeye other than Japan right now (Nikkei TREND = 13,668)

 

Domestically, things looked somewhat better for everything outside of the Treasury and gold market. One of our primary risk gauges, junk bonds, finally took a breather last week, cooling off by a modest 4 bps to 6.58%. 30-Yr conforming mortgage rates, however, climbed higher by 24 bps on Friday alone to 4.64% (Bankrate National Daily Average). 

 

Financial Risk Monitor Summary

 • Short-term(WoW): Negative / 2 of 13 improved / 3 out of 13 worsened / 8 of 13 unchanged

 • Intermediate-term(WoW): Negative / 2 of 13 improved / 7 out of 13 worsened / 4 of 13 unchanged

 • Long-term(WoW): Positive / 4 of 13 improved / 1 out of 13 worsened / 8 of 13 unchanged

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 15

 

1. U.S. Financial CDS -  Swaps tightened for 24 out of 27 domestic financial institutions. While there weren't many large moves, it is worth noting that Citi led the pack among the large caps with a 7 bps narrowing to 124 bps.

 

Tightened the most WoW: C, ALL, HIG

Widened the most WoW: UNM, COF, MMC

Widened the least/ tightened the most WoW: SLM, AON, MMC

Widened the most MoM: GS, MS, C

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 1

 

2. European Financial CDS - Bank swaps were narrowly tighter across Europe last week with negative divergences in Italy and Greece. 

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 2

 

3. Asian Financial CDS - Chinese banks post another week of widening. All three major banks we track posted WoW increases of 15-17 bps.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 17

 

4. Sovereign CDS – Sovereign swaps were mostly uneventful last week with two exceptions. Portugal widened by 73 bps to 474 bps, while Japan tightened by 5 bps to 73 bps. All other major markets were unchanged.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 18

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 3

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 4

 

5. High Yield (YTM) Monitor – High Yield rates fell 4.1 bps last week, ending the week at 6.58% versus 6.62% the prior week.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 5

 

6. Leveraged Loan Index Monitor – The Leveraged Loan Index rose 1.5 points last week, ending at 1784.86.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 6

 

7. TED Spread Monitor – The TED spread fell 0.8 basis points last week, ending the week at 23.19 bps this week versus last week’s print of 24.01 bps.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 7

 

8. Journal of Commerce Commodity Price Index – The JOC index rose 1.4 points, ending the week at -2.59 versus -4.0 the prior week.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 8

 

9. Euribor-OIS Spread – The Euribor-OIS spread widened by 1 bps to 12 bps. The Euribor-OIS spread (the difference between the euro interbank lending rate and overnight indexed swaps) measures bank counterparty risk in the Eurozone. The OIS is analogous to the effective Fed Funds rate in the United States.  Banks lending at the OIS do not swap principal, so counterparty risk in the OIS is minimal.  By contrast, the Euribor rate is the rate offered for unsecured interbank lending.  Thus, the spread between the two isolates counterparty risk. 

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 9

 

10. ECB Liquidity Recourse to the Deposit Facility – Deposits rose by 11.5 billion Euros last week. The ECB Liquidity Recourse to the Deposit Facility measures banks’ overnight deposits with the ECB.  Taken in conjunction with excess reserves, the ECB deposit facility measures excess liquidity in the Euro banking system.  An increase in this metric shows that banks are borrowing from the ECB.  In other words, the deposit facility measures one element of the ECB response to the crisis.  

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 10

 

11. Markit MCDX Index Monitor – Last week spreads widened 2 bps, ending the week at 96 bps versus 94.3 bps the prior week. The Markit MCDX is a measure of municipal credit default swaps. We believe this index is a useful indicator of pressure in state and local governments. Markit publishes index values daily on six 5-year tenor baskets including 50 reference entities each. Each basket includes a diversified pool of revenue and GO bonds from a broad array of states. We track the 16-V1. 

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 11

 

12. Chinese Steel – Steel prices in China rose 1.4% last week, or 48 yuan/ton, to 3406 yuan/ton. We use Chinese steel rebar prices to gauge Chinese construction activity, and, by extension, the health of the Chinese economy.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 12

 

13. 2-10 Spread – Last week the 2-10 spread widened to 234 bps, 14 bps wider than a week ago. We track the 2-10 spread as an indicator of bank margin pressure.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 13

 

14. XLF Macro Quantitative Setup – Our Macro team’s quantitative setup in the XLF shows 1.2% upside to TRADE resistance and 2.1% downside to TRADE support.

 

MONDAY MORNING RISK MONITOR: ASIA CONTINUES TO DECOUPLE FROM THE U.S. - 14

 

Joshua Steiner, CFA

 

Jonathan Casteleyn, CFA, CMT


Great Failures

This note was originally published at 8am on June 24, 2013 for Hedgeye subscribers.

“It was not the common people who were to blame for these failures…”

-Jack Weatherford

 

“Rather, it is the great ones among you who have committed these sins. If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.”

 

Don’t worry, I’m not going to go all religious on you this morning. That’s just what Genghis Kahn told the elite of Bukhara after conquering their centrally planned city. “He then gave each rich man into the control of one of his Mongol warriors who would go with him and collect his treasure.” (Genghis Kahn and The Making of The Modern World, pg 7)

 

Maybe Bernanke and his central planning ideologues around the world should do a little summer reading on my man Genghis and reflect upon how plundering the purchasing power of free peoples ends…

 

Back to the Global Macro Grind

 

And over the #Waterfall bonds go. No matter where you think we were last week, here we are – lots of Global Macro tourists who didn’t respect the VELOCITY + VOLUME of the water approaching our bifurcation point (2.41% = the dam) = soaking wet.

 

So, to start, Hedgeye Risk Management will, in #OldWall style, “reiterate” the following Global Macro positions:

  1. 0% asset allocation to Commodities
  2. 0% asset allocation to Fixed Income
  3. 0% asset allocation to Emerging Market Debt and Equity

As the US Treasury 10yr Yield rips through our critical intermediate-term breakout line of 2.41% to 2.60% this morning, everything starts to happen a lot faster. The aforementioned 0% asset allocations were already in motion. We affectionately called Commodities, Bonds, and Emerging Markets #BernankeBubbles for a reason. When they pop, there’s no more flow!

 

If you’ve ever tried suspending yourself in mid-air after living in a bubble that’s popped, it doesn’t end well. Neither does living a centrally planned life where everyone in a so called “free-market” is at the beck and call of an un-elected man named Bernanke.

 

That’s all history now. If you didn’t know that the anti-gravity “smoothing” experiment using the most debt leverage in world history has another side of the trade (deflating debt, commodities, emerging markets, etc.), now you know.

 

There are two big potential drivers of asset deflation:

  1. #StrongDollar (US Dollar Index) from her 40yr low (in 2011 when Commodities and Gold peaked)
  2. #RatesRising at an accelerating rate from the 0% bound

No, it’s not the common people who are to blame for deflation. It’s the conflicted and compromised politicians who have been cheered on by those who get paid by Commodity, Fixed Income, and Emerging Market inflations whose bar tab is up.

 

Deflation? If you inflate a bubble to its max, there will eventually be deflation. And, yes, there will be blood. Deflation is only a bad word if you are long the thing that is deflating.

 

But can our institutionalized world of short-term price performance chasing handle a stronger currency and rising interest rates? Can we handle this thing call a long-term cycle turning?

 

And what would more of the same do to our insecure world?

  1. #StrongDollar (+3.2% YTD) = #CommodityDeflation (CRB Index -5.7% YTD), so more of that would be cool #Consumption
  2. #RisingRates (+48% YTD move in UST 10yr Yield) = bad for anything bonds, and good for my hard earned Savings Account
  3. A massively asymmetric shift in the way we have all been paid to invest and allocate capital for the last decade

In chaos theory, we call a big macro cycle turning a Phase Transition. Leading towards this current point of entropy, there were a series of what we call Emergent Properties warning us of a pending phase transition.

 

Some investors get hurt during phase transitions; some prosper. I have a great deal of respect for Bill Gross and what he has built at @PIMCO, but if you read his last 3 tweets, you can get a sense of who doesn’t win if this keeps happening.

 

Stop whining.

 

It’s time to start winning. The USA has never achieved what all these vaunted elites of economics peddle to you as the desired outcome of all this central planning (real inflation-adjusted economic growth) without a #StrongDollar and #RisingRates.

 

To be clear, there will be pain before we all prosper (that’s why we have been cutting our US Equity exposure for 3 weeks). In the early 1980s and the early 1990s, Great Failures in asset allocation became as readily evident as they are this morning:

  1. Emerging Markets (MSCI EM Index) = -5.6% last week and are now -14.7% YTD
  2. Latin America (LATAM EM Index) = -8.1% last week and is now -20.5% YTD
  3. Silver = -9.1% last week and is now -34.2% YTD

Whether it’s the commodity bubble or the emerging market debt bubble, it’s all the same thing. US Central planners committed the great sin of devaluing the hard earned currency of the American people – and now some have to pay the price for that.  The punishment happens the faster rates rise. And I don’t think The People want to go back to the zero bound all over again.

 

Our immediate-term Risk Ranges are now (new format!):

 

UST 10yr Yield 2.41-2.61%

SPX 1566-1622

VIX 16.16-20.45

US Dollar Index 81.21-82.69

USD/YEN Yen 96.54-98.76

Oil (Brent) 100.23-103.73

Gold 1257-1357

 

Best of luck out there today,

KM

 

Keith R. McCullough
Chief Executive Officer

 

Great Failures - ww. cd. waterfall

 

Great Failures - ww. porto


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