Morning Reads From Our Sector Heads

Keith McCullough (CEO):


Gold Extends Bear-Market Plunge Below $1,400 on U.S. Recovery (via Bloomberg)


India Inflation Dips to 40-Month Low, Boosting Rate-Cut Case (via Bloomberg)


Jay Van Sciver (Industrials):


U.S. April Empire State Manufacturing Index (via Bloomberg)


Todd Jordan (GLL):


New rules for Macao gambling trips (via China Daily)


Chinese bird flu cases rise to 60 as the virus starts to spread around the nation (via Quartz)


Matthew Hedrick (Europe):


Europe to Face Washington Disbelief With Economic Claims (via Bloomberg)


Howard Penney (Restaurants):


Shanghai Chicken Served With Blood Shunned as Bird Flu Spreads (via Bloomberg)



Ave daily table revenues (ADTR) increased sequentially from HK$847 million the prior week to HK$924 million this past week, up 18% YoY.  Our full month GGR forecast is HK$27.0-28.0 billion which would represent YoY growth of 11-15%.


Our contacts in Macau indicate that the Mass floors are still busy and no impact from the Bird Flu scare despite the media hype and more strict controls at the borders.  While Q1 GDP in China was softer than expected, housing has been better.  We are researching the following story regarding new controls on junkets limiting them to 10 or few patrons.  We are skeptical that the article has teeth but we will back with you asap if we learn anything new.


Looking at market share, MPEL (our favorite name in the group) and LVS are tracking well above recent trend.  We already think MPEL will beat Q1 expectations, and even more so on a hold-adjusted basis, and now Q2 is off to a great start.  We fully expect LVS to be on a northwardly trajectory all year long in terms of market share and while the April jump may be due in part to hold (particularly in week 1), the trend is encouraging.  The other operators are all tracking below recent trend.





Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold

Takeaway: We update our bearish bias on gold with a contrarian analysis of the fundamental drivers of this asset class.

This note was originally posted on December 14, 2012. As the price of gold crashes today, we’d like to point out that Hedgeye CEO Keith McCullough has shorted gold via the Gold Miners ETF (GDX) eight times since September 2012 and is batting 8 for 8 in our Real-Time Alerts.




•             Gold remains a crowded long for a variety of very obvious reasons – one of which could become less supportive, at the margins, on a sustainable basis.

•             In the note below, we thought we’d take a stab at how a core component of the bull case (i.e. central bank diversification) can come unwound over the long-term TAIL. It’s very important to note that we’re not positing this as the only factor driving the market price of gold; nor are we necessarily suggesting that this is a thesis to run out and short gold today with. Rather, we are offering intellectual ammunition to understand what’s likely going on behind the scenes in the event gold continues to make lower-highs over the intermediate-to-long term.

•             Sustained weakness in the JPY and EUR along with a diminished EM central bank purchases of gold (relative to investor expectations) could provide the necessary lubrication for a sustained USD rally and lower-highs in the price of gold over the long term.

•             All told, we think investors should consider reducing their allocation to this asset class. At a bare minimum, it would be prudent for gold bulls to confirm whether or not our TAIL support ($1,669) holds before increasing exposure to gold here. If $1,669 breaks, there’s no true support to the prior closing lows.


Gold is widely loved and probably over-owned – at both the institutional and sovereign level. Having appreciated in value for 12 consecutive years with a CAGR of 16.4%, the bull case on gold is well understood by just about every market participant.


This is true from traditional L/S equity hedge fund managers all the way down to retail investors, as ETF volumes have been the only thing mitigating the precipitous decline in physical gold demand. The latest data from the World Gold Council (3Q12) showed overall demand had declined -11% YoY from the all-time peak in 3Q11, with every category posting a contraction except “ETF & similar”:



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc1 


Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc2



It’s not surprising to see demand for physical gold peaked when the price of hit an all-time peak of ~$1,900 early in the quarter.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc3



We’ll hold off on the discussion on gold supply, as we firmly believe PRICE eventually leads supply in most, if not all commodity markets. For example, if the price of gold rips to the upside, gold miners will likely follow the move by instituting aggressive E&P plans. If the gold price were to plummet, many producers will struggle to operate their mines above the cost of capital and will eventually curb production. Anything in between probably equates to a status quo level of supply growth.


Going back to the point we made earlier about the bull case being deeply penetrated, we thought we’d take a stab at how a core component of the bull case (i.e. central bank diversification) can come unwound over the long-term TAIL. It’s very important to note that we’re not positing this as the only factor driving the market price of gold; nor are we necessarily suggesting that this is a thesis to run out and short gold today with. Rather, we are offering intellectual ammunition to understand what’s likely going on behind the scenes in the event gold continues to make lower-highs over the intermediate-to-long term.



Gold has ripped for over a decade as central banks increasingly diversified out of the primary world reserve currency and into other, more credible currencies, as well as other assets like SDRs and Gold.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc4



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc5


We hold the view that credibility within the FX market is 100% relative and ever-changing. The management of foreign exchange is a 24-hour-per-day phenomenon that is consistently anchors on incremental data. Below, we focus specifically on the US because gold and other internationally traded commodities are priced in and settled in USD.


For 10+ years, the stream of incremental data has been a general headwind for the credibility of America’s currency, largely in the form of loose fiscal POLICY and dovish monetary POLICY. That confluence of weak POLICY has created an egregious amount of international money supply that has inflated international reserve assets across both the developed world and non-developed world. Initially, the price of gold appreciated w/o much of a shift in global central bank demand. That changed in 2004 when the confluence of the world’s reserve mangers started to accumulate gold at a rate commensurate with the rate of incremental foreign exchange accumulation. Since 2008 (not ironically when QE1 was introduced), however, they’ve been accumulating gold at a faster rate than incremental FX.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc6



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc7



The first major run-up in gold (2004-2008) was occurred as DM central banks began favoring gold over incremental foreign exchange, at the margins. The second major leg up in gold prices came as EM central banks began to do the same (2008-present). This is where the real “juice” likely came from, as EM central banks have increasingly held the lion share of international reserve assets.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc8


The latter point is super intuitive, given that EM economies, on balance, have tended to be more manufacturing and export-oriented in nature (think: China). Additionally, EM central banks have likely aggressively accumulated large amounts of foreign exchange (in lieu of gold, at the margins) over the last 10+ years to resist appreciation pressure on their currencies (think: Chinese yuan and Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega’s “Currency War”).


For reference, Switzerland has been doing exactly this (i.e. accumulating foreign exchange at a rate faster than gold) for the better part of 30 years, as the SNB has semi-perpetually combated the specter of a secular loss of competitiveness – which is a real threat given the country’s +42.9% real exchange rate appreciation over that duration. The CHF’s de-facto ceiling vs. the EUR is yet another example of the Swizz central bank being forced to accumulate incremental FX, lest the country suffer the perceived consequences of having a strong currency amid the international “race to zero” in today’s “Beggar Thy Neighbor” global economy.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc9


That brings us to our final point, which is really a question:


Can EM central banks ever really accumulate that much gold – especially relative to consensus expectations that they are poised to be big players in that market in perpetuity?


There seems to be little political will across the developing world to allow for any dramatic currency appreciation – especially with global GROWTH likely tracking in the +2-3% range for the foreseeable future. This means EM central bankers will continue to be forced to daub up large amounts of fiat currency over the long-term, absent a phase change in the global monetary POLICY landscape.


In light of this, it’s important to note that the People’s Bank of China (a key player in the FX reserve accumulation sphere) now views the yuan at/near an “equilibrium level” and they have been using their USD/CNY reference rate as a tool to temper appreciation pressure emanating from the market for several months now. Incremental Polices To Inflate out of DM central banks will force them to accelerate their pace of foreign exchange accumulation if they are going to resist upward pressure on CNY exchange rates from current levels.


What’s new across developed markets is the political will for the Europeans and the Japanese to pursue incrementally aggressive currency devaluation strategies over the intermediate-to-long term. Keep in mind that we haven’t even seen the ECB really go to town w/ unsterilized bond purchases and that the BOJ’s balance sheet is poised to expand to new heights in a variety of experimental manners under the pending LDP regime.


In short, we think Japan faces the risk of a currency crash (peak-to-trough decline > 20%) over the next 12-18 months. Moreover, unless Europe has been magically fixed (are the Greek and Spanish unemployment situations even “fixable”??), the EUR is likely to continue making lower-highs over the long term. In the eyes of the world’s central bankers, the perceived credibility of the JPY and EUR are likely to be materially eroded over the long term, which, on the margin, is positive for other countries’ currencies to the extent they are credible candidates for international reserve management.


In the aforementioned Global Macro scenario, could we see the USD grind higher against a broad basket of currencies over the intermediate-to-long term? Absolutely – especially if US fiscal POLICY starts to get hawkish on the margin (think: Fiscal Cliff). Perhaps that’s why the US Dollar Index is down less than 100bps YoY, despite the Federal Reserve kicking the ZIRP can down the road 3x in the YTD and instituting perpetual QE – twice in the last three months!



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc10


If one is bearish on the US Dollar from here, we can’t even begin to fathom what their next catalyst is, given the USD’s resilience in the face of all that…


In the past, strong USD has been really bad for gold (early-to-mid 1980’s and late 1990’s). The most recent period of sustained USD appreciation came on the strength of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, so it’s critically important to avoid underweighting fiscal POLICY as a factor for the market price of America’s currency. If Congress and the White House can figure out a way to resolve the Fiscal Cliff in a sustainable and effective manner (a really big “if”), we could see the US Dollar Index approach the high 80s/low 90s level over the intermediate term. That would not be good for gold.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc11


Our quantitative risk management levels for Gold are included in the chart below. If $1,669 breaks, there’s no true support to the prior closing lows. That’s something to think about as you ponder, “Who’s the incremental buyer of gold from here?” For some, that question sounds more like, “Who can I offload my gold to if and when I want to head for the exits before the crowd does?”.



Thinking Way Outside The Box On Gold - goldc12


Gold remains a crowded long for a variety of very obvious reasons – one of which could become less supportive, at the margins, on a sustainable basis.

investing ideas

Risk Managed Long Term Investing for Pros

Hedgeye CEO Keith McCullough handpicks the “best of the best” long and short ideas delivered to him by our team of over 30 research analysts across myriad sectors.

Popping The Bubble

Client Talking Points

Goodbye, Gold

Practically overnight, gold fell nearly $100 to $1400/oz. What's the catalyst? A stronger US dollar that has kept appreciating in value over the last three months has helped pop the great commodity bubble brought on by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. We had a 40-year low in the US dollar and 40-year high in gold (read: top) in 2011 that was simply unsustainable. Gold prices are crashing and the metal is going down in flames. Further downside pressure will be exacerbated as fund managers and the retail crowd all flee the crowded theater in an effort to escape, which will drive the ask price lower and lower. 

Consumption = Growth

As commodity prices head lower across the board, consumption in the US has increased which in turn has driven growth. It's really not that complicated when you think about how the downturn in commodities has helped drive growth. When people encounter lower gas prices at the pump and cheaper food at the grocery store, they tend to consume more. 

If you look at the complexion of the S&P 500’s Sector returns for April to-date, it’s the same story (Consumption vs Commodities):


  1. US Healthcare Stocks (XLV) = +4.18% for APR to date
  2. US Consumer Discretionary (XLY) = +2.66% for APR to date
  3. Basic Materials (XLB) and Energy (XLE) = -1.65% and -1.12% for APR to date, respectively




The pundits who have been marketing gold under the guise that the end of the world is coming can no longer play that card when the S&P 500 is up +11.5% year-to-date.

Asset Allocation


Top Long Ideas

Company Ticker Sector Duration

Decent earnings visibility, stabilized market share, and aggressive share repurchases should keep a floor on the stock.  Near-term earnings, potentially big orders from Oregon and South Dakota, and news of proliferating gaming domestically could provide near term catalysts for a stock that trades at only 11x EPS.  We believe that multiple is unsustainably low – and management likely agrees given the buyback – for a company with the balance sheet and strong cash flow as IGT.  Given private equity’s interest in WMS (they lost out to SGMS) – a company similar to IGT that unlike IGT generates little free cash – we wouldn’t rule out a privatizing transaction to realize the inherent value in this company.


With FedEx Express margins at a 30+ year low and 4-7 percentage points behind competitors, the opportunity for effective cost reductions appears significant. FedEx Ground is using its structural advantages to take market share from UPS. FDX competes in a highly consolidated industry with rational pricing. Both the Ground and Express divisions could be separately worth more than FDX’s current market value, in our view.


HOLX remains one of our favorite longer-term fundamental growth companies given growing penetration of its 3D Tomo platform and high leverage to the 2014 Insurance Expansion from the Affordable Care Act.

Three for the Road


"Commodity margin clerks will be ordering lunch in today, big opportunity for Seamless Web." -@ReformedBroker


"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse." -Bruce Cockburn


China's economy grew 7.7% in the first quarter of 2013, missing estimates.


The Macau Metro Monitor, April 15, 2013




The central government’s mouthpiece China Daily has reported that Beijing has imposed new rules for Macau gambling trips.  China Daily said that people who organize trips with more than 10 mainlanders to come to gamble in Macau, and profit from such trips, will be charged with the crime of gambling, in-line with Chinese Criminal Law.  

Since Macau is an independent jurisdiction, the decision as to whether mainland citizens gambling in Macau are doing something illegal or not will “be decided case by case”, the ministry's petition office said at, a website owned by The People’s Daily.



SJM CEO Angela Leong said the company would act quickly to improve the air quality inside the casinos and slot machine parlours operated under its gaming licence.  The improvements inside the casinos’ smoking areas would involve further discussion with SJM’s partners.  Almost two thirds (28) of Macau’s gaming venues failed to meet the compulsory air quality requirements for their smoking areas, according to a maiden evaluation by the Health Bureau in late March.



Pansy Ho, the chairperson of MGM China, says the days when Macau was seen as a shady gaming centre, connected with money laundering and violence, are gone.  “It has cleaned up,” Ho said.  “We don’t see any of that happening [now].”  She also said she is confident the central government will continue allowing the number of mainland visitors coming to Macau to increase, albeit not necessarily at double-digit rates.



Passenger growth at Singapore is slowing significantly, making it very unlikely Changi will expand in 2013 its current streak of three consecutive years of double-digit expansion.  Singapore authorities should still accelerate airport expansion, particularly the opening of a third runway, because the current congestion has already become an impediment to growth.


In the latest blow to Changi, AirAsia has decided to close its Singapore base.  Shifting back to Malaysia, the group’s small contingent of Singapore-based crews will have a very slight impact on total passenger figures at Changi.  But it signals the challenges Changi faces as its LCC growth figures start to slow down while other airports in the region continue to record rapid increases.


The AirAsia decision follows Qantas moving its transit hub for European services from Singapore to Dubai, leading to a reduction in total Changi capacity of more than 2%.

The Great Contest

This note was originally published at 8am on April 01, 2013 for Hedgeye subscribers.

“Well, I understand that you are to beat me in this contest.”

-John Adams


That, of course, is what Adams told Thomas Jefferson when it became clear to him in 1800 that Jefferson was going to replace him and become the 3rd President of the United States.


Mr. Adams, this is no personal contest between you and me… Two systems of principles on the subject of government divide our fellow-citizens into two parties. With one of these you concur, and I with the other.” –Thomas Jefferson (The Art of Power, page 327-328)


In all great contests, there are two competitors, teams, and/or ideas. In all great contests, someone wins and someone loses. In the greatest of contests, the winner is gracious in victory – and the loser learns from defeat.


Back to the Global Macro Grind


Let us, then, fellow-citizens, unite with one heart and one mind” (Jefferson during his inaugural address of 1801), and become Yale Hockey fans as they head to the Frozen Four, for the first time since 1952!


(I had to find a way to slip that in there)


In other news, crisis-mongering remains in crisis and US stocks hit an all-time high last week.


As we like to say here at Hedgeye Risk Management – all-time is a long time, and this all-time high was driven by the fulcrum point of our bull case for US (and Chinese) Consumption Growth – a Strong US Dollar.


With the US Dollar up for the 7th week in the last 8 (+0.74% to 83.14 on the US Dollar Index):

  1. Down -3% in the last 2 months, Brent Oil Prices stopped going down last wk (+2.2% to close the wk at $110.02/barrel)
  2. Food Prices continued to get pulverized week-over-week (Wheat -5.8%, Corn -4.3%, and Soy -2.5%, last wk alone)

And the net long positions in commodities (futures and options contracts) continue to go squirrely:

  1. Gold – net long positions fell another -14% on the wk after Gold’s price fell -0.7% (net long position -41% YTD)
  2. Silver – net long position continued to crash (-77% on the wk!) to its lowest level since 2007
  3. Copper – built a record net short position of -30,036 contracts

The thing about shiny metals is that (after Gold went up for 12 years in a row) a lot of people own them now in lieu of what were Burning Bernanke Bucks. That (and all those Gold commercials you still hear on the radio) is a rear-view looking thesis. So is the end of the world.


As the great USA Olympic Hockey Coach, Herb Brooks, might say about this morning’s metals update – “Again!”:

  1. Gold is flattish around $1598/oz (down -4.6% YTD)
  2. Silver is down another -0.9% to $28.04/oz (down -13% from its early 2013 high)
  3. Copper leads losers in Global Macro trading this morning, down another -1.3% to $3.35/lb

All the while, The Great Contest between #PTCs (professional top callers) and those of us who change as the game does rages on. Are Food, Energy, and Metals prices deflating a good or a bad thing for the global consumption economy?


What do we know, but the last time our models were this bullish on US economic growth prospects relative to consensus was in 2009 when many of these same factors rhymed. The Dollar rose from its ashes and Commodity prices kept crashing well into Q209.


But if you sold in May of 2009 and went away, was that a good decision or a bad one? What if you sold in April of 2009? My keen sense from my latest institutional client meetings is that a lot of people are still looking for a big Q2 correction. What if it doesn’t come?


Risk obviously happens fast, so we’ll be sure to let you know if anything changes in terms of our intermediate-term TREND view (bullish on Asian and US stocks; bearish on Commodities, Yens, Treasuries). In the meantime, may the great contest between bulls and bears continue!


Our immediate-term Risk Ranges for Gold, Oil (Brent), Copper, US Dollar, USD/YEN, UST 10yr Yield, VIX, Russell2000, and the SP500 are now $1592-1605, $106.75-110.39, $3.34-3.44, $82.61-83.49, 93.44-96.35, 1.84-1.95%, 12.13-14.26, 947-955, and 1556-1572, respectively.


Best of luck out there this week,



Keith R. McCullough
Chief Executive Officer


The Great Contest - Chart of the Day


The Great Contest - Virtual Portfolio

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